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Creating Sets of Tunes
#1
Hi all readers, if you are still out there,

I have a large collections of tunes and would like to make up a few sets -  but where do I start????

Do you use same key, same style mixed keys or mixed styles.   Any advise would be appreciated.

To date I have  Boy's lament for his dragon, Hurlock's reel and Robertson's reel, all in G,  in a set I've called "Robertson's Lament for Hurlock's Dragon".

cheers

Drew
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#2
Guess no-one is really involved in this Forum anymore. Sadly their is no real Forum for predominately Scottish Music, Mostly American or Irish. Nothing wrong with that but I would like to have seen this more active and promoting Scottish Music.

Alcluith
Reply
#3
(31-03-2019, 11:04 AM)Alcluith Wrote: Guess no-one is really involved in this Forum anymore. Sadly their is no real Forum for predominately Scottish Music, Mostly American or Irish. Nothing wrong with that but I would like to have seen this more active and promoting Scottish Music.

Alcluith

Very quiet indeed, Drew.

Re your query: I think it is very much a matter of personal choice (or group choice if you are playing in a regular session or in a band).  There are tunes which seem to flow from each other somehow and get put together  to become regular sets. You are doing this already, from what you say.

When we play in our weekly session we have several sets which are always popular, and even in those, there are variations.  If we play Spootiskerry my own "natural" follow-on is Willafjord, but others in the group favour The Barrowburn Reel.  Both work equally well, and both involve key changes.  We play sets of Gaelic waltzes and a popular one is to play Leaving Lismore, Morag of Dunvegan and The South Georgia Whaling Song, all in the key of D;  I play with other musicians using this set but we change keys between tunes!

Sets tend to be of a type - reels, jigs, waltzes or whatever, but sometimes, especially if playing for an audience rather than for dancing, it is effective to have mixed types;  My band used to play Phil Cunningham's Sarah's Song followed by Tam Bain's Lum, tow very different tunes in almost every way.  Audiences liked the change from the slow to the fast tune.

Whn you have been playing for some time, you will have tunes in your head that just seems to follow each other - pipe selections are like this, I would say.  I posted a set last week on my YouTube channel consisting of two slow pipe airs by PM John McLellan DCM.  The tunes are Mary Darroch and The Sheiling, both in 6/4 time but the first in D major and the secong in A mixolydian.  I think they work well together.

Ultimately, if it is for your own enjoyment, then you are free to have what you wish, and you will soon find that you begin to favour some groupings over others.  These may involve key changes, lead instrument changes, etc.  Playing for dancing is maybe a bit different, I would say.  Dancers want a steady beat and probably are not so aware of things like key changes, but if you mess up the rhythm, you will soon know about it!

Hope this helps, even just to keep some life in the forum!
Reply
#4
(31-03-2019, 12:22 PM)John Kelly Wrote:
(31-03-2019, 11:04 AM)Alcluith Wrote: Guess no-one is really involved in this Forum anymore. Sadly their is no real Forum for predominately Scottish Music, Mostly American or Irish. Nothing wrong with that but I would like to have seen this more active and promoting Scottish Music.

Alcluith

Very quiet indeed, Drew.

Re your query: I think it is very much a matter of personal choice (or group choice if you are playing in a regular session or in a band).  There are tunes which seem to flow from each other somehow and get put together  to become regular sets. You are doing this already, from what you say.

When we play in our weekly session we have several sets which are always popular, and even in those, there are variations.  If we play Spootiskerry my own "natural" follow-on is Willafjord, but others in the group favour The Barrowburn Reel.  Both work equally well, and both involve key changes.  We play sets of Gaelic waltzes and a popular one is to play Leaving Lismore, Morag of Dunvegan and The South Georgia Whaling Song, all in the key of D;  I play with other musicians using this set but we change keys between tunes!

Sets tend to be of a type - reels, jigs, waltzes or whatever, but sometimes, especially if playing for an audience rather than for dancing, it is effective to have mixed types;  My band used to play Phil Cunningham's Sarah's Song followed by Tam Bain's Lum, tow very different tunes in almost every way.  Audiences liked the change from the slow to the fast tune.

Whn you have been playing for some time, you will have tunes in your head that just seems to follow each other - pipe selections are like this, I would say.  I posted a set last week on my YouTube channel consisting of two slow pipe airs by PM John McLellan DCM.  The tunes are Mary Darroch and The Sheiling, both in 6/4 time but the first in D major and the secong in A mixolydian.  I think they work well together.

Ultimately, if it is for your own enjoyment, then you are free to have what you wish, and you will soon find that you begin to favour some groupings over others.  These may involve key changes, lead instrument changes, etc.  Playing for dancing is maybe a bit different, I would say.  Dancers want a steady beat and probably are not so aware of things like key changes, but if you mess up the rhythm, you will soon know about it!

Hope this helps, even just to keep some life in the forum!
Hi John

Thank you for your reply, I play with my brother, just for our own pleasure, I am still learning and trying to get away from reliance on tabs. Have a few that I can play and a few that I still need the dots but getting there.   I was listening to your tunes by John McLellan and thought how nice they are. Looked up the Cowal Collection but neither included, but some really interested tunes, some I would like to learn. 
Our family have a history of of The ASH right back to Crimean war. My Uncle played pipes when he was in the Scots, but we only found that out a few years ago. He was a RSM in the Red Caps, and never played the pipes after he married, so we never got chance to hear him.

cheers

Drew
Reply
#5
(01-04-2019, 03:05 PM)Alcluith Wrote:
(31-03-2019, 12:22 PM)John Kelly Wrote:
(31-03-2019, 11:04 AM)Alcluith Wrote: Guess no-one is really involved in this Forum anymore. Sadly their is no real Forum for predominately Scottish Music, Mostly American or Irish. Nothing wrong with that but I would like to have seen this more active and promoting Scottish Music.

Alcluith

Very quiet indeed, Drew.

Re your query: I think it is very much a matter of personal choice (or group choice if you are playing in a regular session or in a band).  There are tunes which seem to flow from each other somehow and get put together  to become regular sets. You are doing this already, from what you say.

When we play in our weekly session we have several sets which are always popular, and even in those, there are variations.  If we play Spootiskerry my own "natural" follow-on is Willafjord, but others in the group favour The Barrowburn Reel.  Both work equally well, and both involve key changes.  We play sets of Gaelic waltzes and a popular one is to play Leaving Lismore, Morag of Dunvegan and The South Georgia Whaling Song, all in the key of D;  I play with other musicians using this set but we change keys between tunes!

Sets tend to be of a type - reels, jigs, waltzes or whatever, but sometimes, especially if playing for an audience rather than for dancing, it is effective to have mixed types;  My band used to play Phil Cunningham's Sarah's Song followed by Tam Bain's Lum, tow very different tunes in almost every way.  Audiences liked the change from the slow to the fast tune.

Whn you have been playing for some time, you will have tunes in your head that just seems to follow each other - pipe selections are like this, I would say.  I posted a set last week on my YouTube channel consisting of two slow pipe airs by PM John McLellan DCM.  The tunes are Mary Darroch and The Sheiling, both in 6/4 time but the first in D major and the secong in A mixolydian.  I think they work well together.

Ultimately, if it is for your own enjoyment, then you are free to have what you wish, and you will soon find that you begin to favour some groupings over others.  These may involve key changes, lead instrument changes, etc.  Playing for dancing is maybe a bit different, I would say.  Dancers want a steady beat and probably are not so aware of things like key changes, but if you mess up the rhythm, you will soon know about it!

Hope this helps, even just to keep some life in the forum!
Hi John

Thank you for your reply, I play with my brother, just for our own pleasure, I am still learning and trying to get away from reliance on tabs. Have a few that I can play and a few that I still need the dots but getting there.   I was listening to your tunes by John McLellan and thought how nice they are. Looked up the Cowal Collection but neither included, but some really interested tunes, some I would like to learn. 
Our family have a history of of The ASH right back to Crimean war. My Uncle played pipes when he was in the Scots, but we only found that out a few years ago. He was a RSM in the Red Caps, and never played the pipes after he married, so we never got chance to hear him.

cheers

Drew

Hi again, Drew.

I have a book of McLellan's tunes, but in pipe notation (my two daughters are pipers and my maternal grandfather was a pipe sergeant in the 8th Argylls at the time of WW1, but piping slipped by me!

This book is called "The Collected Works of PM John McLellan", compiled by PM Bruce Campbell and published by Duntroon Publishing in co-operation with the Cowal Highland Gathering.  ISBN is: 0-9546334-4-X.

I can create TAB notation for you if you'd like, from the pipe scores.  If you send me your e-mail address I can send you pdf when I have it done.  I find it hard to send attachments via this forum.

Happy playing,

John
Reply
#6
(02-04-2019, 09:09 AM)John Kelly Wrote:
(01-04-2019, 03:05 PM)Alcluith Wrote:
(31-03-2019, 12:22 PM)John Kelly Wrote:
(31-03-2019, 11:04 AM)Alcluith Wrote: Guess no-one is really involved in this Forum anymore. Sadly their is no real Forum for predominately Scottish Music, Mostly American or Irish. Nothing wrong with that but I would like to have seen this more active and promoting Scottish Music.

Alcluith

Very quiet indeed, Drew.

Re your query: I think it is very much a matter of personal choice (or group choice if you are playing in a regular session or in a band).  There are tunes which seem to flow from each other somehow and get put together  to become regular sets. You are doing this already, from what you say.

When we play in our weekly session we have several sets which are always popular, and even in those, there are variations.  If we play Spootiskerry my own "natural" follow-on is Willafjord, but others in the group favour The Barrowburn Reel.  Both work equally well, and both involve key changes.  We play sets of Gaelic waltzes and a popular one is to play Leaving Lismore, Morag of Dunvegan and The South Georgia Whaling Song, all in the key of D;  I play with other musicians using this set but we change keys between tunes!

Sets tend to be of a type - reels, jigs, waltzes or whatever, but sometimes, especially if playing for an audience rather than for dancing, it is effective to have mixed types;  My band used to play Phil Cunningham's Sarah's Song followed by Tam Bain's Lum, tow very different tunes in almost every way.  Audiences liked the change from the slow to the fast tune.

Whn you have been playing for some time, you will have tunes in your head that just seems to follow each other - pipe selections are like this, I would say.  I posted a set last week on my YouTube channel consisting of two slow pipe airs by PM John McLellan DCM.  The tunes are Mary Darroch and The Sheiling, both in 6/4 time but the first in D major and the secong in A mixolydian.  I think they work well together.

Ultimately, if it is for your own enjoyment, then you are free to have what you wish, and you will soon find that you begin to favour some groupings over others.  These may involve key changes, lead instrument changes, etc.  Playing for dancing is maybe a bit different, I would say.  Dancers want a steady beat and probably are not so aware of things like key changes, but if you mess up the rhythm, you will soon know about it!

Hope this helps, even just to keep some life in the forum!
Hi John

Thank you for your reply, I play with my brother, just for our own pleasure, I am still learning and trying to get away from reliance on tabs. Have a few that I can play and a few that I still need the dots but getting there.   I was listening to your tunes by John McLellan and thought how nice they are. Looked up the Cowal Collection but neither included, but some really interested tunes, some I would like to learn. 
Our family have a history of of The ASH right back to Crimean war. My Uncle played pipes when he was in the Scots, but we only found that out a few years ago. He was a RSM in the Red Caps, and never played the pipes after he married, so we never got chance to hear him.

cheers

Drew

Hi again, Drew.

I have a book of McLellan's tunes, but in pipe notation (my two daughters are pipers and my maternal grandfather was a pipe sergeant in the 8th Argylls at the time of WW1, but piping slipped by me!

This book is called "The Collected Works of PM John McLellan", compiled by PM Bruce Campbell and published by Duntroon Publishing in co-operation with the Cowal Highland Gathering.  ISBN is: 0-9546334-4-X.

I can create TAB notation for you if you'd like, from the pipe scores.  If you send me your e-mail address I can send you pdf when I have it done.  I find it hard to send attachments via this forum.

Happy playing,

John

Tunes sent via e-mail, Drew.  Have fun with them.
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